Staff

Dr Janette Bulkan

Assistant Professor Indigenous Forestry

Dr Bulkan has joined the Department of Forest Resources Management as an assistant professor of Indigenous forestry. She is a linguist and anthropologist by training, is a former diplomat, and has work experience in social forestry, participatory resource management, monitoring and evaluation, cultural diversity awareness and protection, and teaching. Janette founded the Amerindian Research Unit at the University of Guyana and was its coordinator from 1985 to 1999. From 2000 to 2003 she was senior social scientist at the Iwokrama Centre for Rainforest Conservation and Development in Guyana. Janette is also interested in the areas of forest certification, control of illegal logging, anti-corruption, and REDD+ (reduced emissions from deforestation and forest degradation). In her new position with the Faculty of Forestry she will be teaching an undergraduate community forestry course and plans to develop other courses in the areas of social and Indigenous forestry. Janette will collaborate with colleagues in mainstreaming Aboriginal and Indigenous studies across the Faculty (Commitment #4 of the Faculty’s Strategic Plan) and will help to develop mutually beneficial research collaborations between the Faculty of Forestry and Aboriginal communities in Canada and globally.

janette

First Nations Council of Advisors

In 1994, the Faculty of Forestry began the formation of a community-based advisory group to provide ongoing input on Aboriginal Initiatives and to evaluate work as it progresses. This committee meets once a year, with bi-monthly phone calls as necessary. Members are comprised of Aboriginal alumni, community leaders and industry and association groups including forest industry, government and the ABCFP.

Keith Atkinson

FNCOA Co-Chair, CEO BC First Nations Forestry Council

Keith Atkinson, Registered Professional Forester is the Chief Executive Officer of the British Columbia (BC) First Nations Forestry Council which is a non-profit society working to support all 203 First Nations communities in BC with their in the forest sector. Over the past ten years First Nations involvement has grown to include over 13 million cubic meters of timber harvesting rights per year and significant developments in partnership with industry, capacity building in communities and policy changes including the development of a new form of forest tenure, the First Nations Woodland Licence. The current focus of the FNFC is to support business development in forestry; providing a forest resource office to support community issues; and to advocate for continued policy changes that recognize and support First Nations values and principles.

Keith grew up in coastal communities, is a member of the Snuneymuxw First Nation, and lives in North Vancouver. Keith graduated from UBC Faculty of Forestry in 1994 and developed his career as a forester through consulting forest management with an emphasis on First Nations participating in tenure opportunities. Keith has been involved with the UBC First Nations Council of Advisors since it began in 1994 and more recently has served as a co-chair of the First Nations Council of Advisors. He also sits on Faculty of Forestry’s Forestry Advisory Council.

Keith Atkinson


Jeremy Boyd

Forester and Operations Forester Sasquatch Forest Products LLP
Jeremy has implemented forestry operations for several First Nations in the coastal and interior forests of British Columbia (BC). From the Tsilhqot’in Nation, Jeremy enjoys assisting and learning with all Aboriginal communities. Jeremy was actively involved in both University of British Columbia (UBC) Summer Forestry camps for junior and senior high school students. Jeremy’s advice to all future students “remember that no one knows yourself better than you”. Jeremy received a Bachelor of Science in Forestry from UBC, specializing in forest resource management and returned to the Faculty of Forestry to receive a Master of Science in Forestry. Jeremy has served on the First Nations Council of Advisors since 2006.

Currently, Jeremy is ensuring Sts’ailes Development Corporation (SDC) meets their forest license obligations while harvesting within the coastal forest industry. Jeremy is helping SDC foster new business relationships with the forest sector and he is utilizing the ‘learning by doing’ approach as a Registered Professional Forester. Jeremy is actively involved with SDC subcontractors on clearing the right-of-way and building access roads for a new BC Hydro transmission line that runs through the territory. Jeremy has learned that ‘Aboriginal Forestry’ is a complex and sensitive process that will take time to reach.

Jeremy Boyd


Lennard Joe

General Manager, Stuwix Resources Joint Venture
Lennard Joe, Registered Professional Forester is an alumnus of the UBC Faculty of Forestry Natural Resource Conservation program. Lennard has over 16 years of experience working in the forest sector with extensive experience working with First Nations in the interior of BC. Lennard is the General Manager of Stuwix Resources Joint Venture (Stuwix). Established in 2004, Stuwix is a market logging and forest management company, owned and operated by seven First Nations Bands in the Southern Interior of British Columbia.

For over a decade, Lennard managed his own forestry consulting business Grizzly Man Resource Management. In 2010, Grizzly Man won business of the year, two to 10 person enterprise from the BC Aboriginal Awards.

Lennard has been a member of the First Nations Council of Advisors since 2006.

Lennard Joe


Larry Joseph

Social Forester and Director, Forest Stewardship Council International
Larry Joseph currently serves as a social forester and Director (2011 to the present) on the Board of the Forest Stewardship Council International (FSC). It’s a certification system for forests, paper and wood in some 80 countries.

Larry is proud to be one of the founders of the Permanent Indigenous Peoples’ Committee within FSC. Larry is a global advocate for indigenous rights, human rights, forest certification, and forest conservation. Recently, he has worked as a National Risk Assessment Technical Advisor, for the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) in Canada. Larry is a member of the Frog Clan. His grandparents and great grandparents were well-known hereditary chiefs on both his mother and father’s side of the family.

Larry Joseph


Linc Kesler

Director, First Nations’ House of Learning Professor and Head Dep’t of Indigenous Studies
Linc is the Director of the UBC First Nations House of Learning and Senior Advisor to the President on Aboriginal Affairs. Linc has been with the First Nations Studies Program since its inception in 2003. He has designed and up until recently, taught FNSP 310, 320 and 400. From 2003 through 2012, Linc was the Chair of the First Nations Studies Program. In 2008, he was the co-chair for the UBC’s Aboriginal Strategic Plan. In January 2009, Linc was appointed Director of the UBC First Nations House of Learning and Senior Advisor to the President on Aboriginal Affairs. Linc has been involved with various FNSP Initiatives, including the Oral Narratives of the Klamath Termination, the development of the Interactive Video/Transcript Viewer, and Indigenous Foundations. For 2008-2009, Linc was named the recipient the Dean of Arts award. Linc has served on the First Nations Council of Advisors since 2006.

Linc Kesler


Alison Krahn

Aboriginal Initiatives Coordinator
Alison is responsible for recruitment and retention of Aboriginal students, liaising with Indigenous communities, and helping to develop and implement curricula and outreach efforts. Alison is a teacher by training, having earned a B.Ed. from UBC. She also holds a M.A. in Educational Studies from UBC, where she completed a community-based research project designed to enhance school learning for Aboriginal students. Alison has extensive experience in experiential education, student support, curriculum design and community/stakeholder engagement.

Alison Krahn


Garry Merkel

FNCOA Co-Chair, Forester, President, Forest Innovations
Over the last 30 years, Garry Merkel, Registered Professional Forester, has been involved in creating businesses, schools, various land management arrangements, public policy, foundations, working relationships and government. He has worked with various First Nations across Canada, the United States and internationally in various areas such as political advocacy, building organizations, negotiating treaties, developing governments, strategic planning, creating and managing administration, business development, education infrastructure and program development, managing businesses and programs, creating land management infrastructure, negotiating a wide spectrum of agreements, traditional ecological knowledge inventories and use and others.

Garry’s formal education includes a Forest Technologist Diploma, Selkirk College, Castlegar, B.C. (with honours) and a B. Sc. Forestry, U. of A., Edmonton, Alberta (with distinction). Garry hails from the Tahltan Nation in the Stikine River area of northwest British Columbia, and currently lives with the Ktunaxa Nation in Kimberley, British Columbia.

Garry helped form the First Nations Council of Advisors (FNCOA) in 1994 and currently serves as co-chair of FNCOA.

In 2013, Garry received the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medal for his significant contributions to the Columbia Basin Trust. In 2012, Garry was recognized as an honorary alumnus by alumni UBC.

Garry Merkel

Jim Munroe

President, Maiyoo Keyoh Society
Jim Munroe is the President for the Maiyoo Keyoh Society. The society was established in 2003 to respond to the court decisions of Haida, Taku, and Delgamuukw decisions as a necessary tool for consultation and accommodation for the Keyohs holders.

Jim Munroe approached UBC’s Faculty of Forestry in 2007 looking for help to develop high-level plans to protect local forest habitat, wildlife and cultural resources. Keyoh means territory that a group of people or extended family has ownership and land rights to. Dakelh (Carrier) law recognizes the heads of extended families as Keyoh holders who are responsible for watching their territories.

With Jim Munroe heavily involved in liaison, UBC Faculty of Forestry students in the Forest Resource Management program have worked with a number of Keyohs in the Fort St. James. region over the past six years. For the past six years, groups of students have visited different Keyohs and developed plans for community forestry projects. The students gain a better understanding of local community values and how to apply knowledge about Aboriginal rights and title. This prepares them for their future careers as foresters and working with Aboriginal communities. It is an example of a mutually supportive and productive relationship between the Maiyoo Keyoh, Professors John Nelson and Gary Bull and the students in FRST 424.

Jim has been a guest speaker at the Indigenous Earths Praxis, the FORREX Forest Carbon Extension Seminars, and the National Geographers Conference of Australia.

Jim is from Sumas First Nation of Abbotsford and married Petra from the Maiyoo Keyoh, together they have 6 children. Their extended family are the hereditary stewards of the Maiyoo Keyoh, an extended family territory in central British Columbia. Jim is the spokesman for Sally Sam, hereditary Chief of a family owned territory within the Maiyoo Keyoh.

Jim Munroe


David Nordquist

Forester, Adams Lake Indian Band
Dave provides title and rights advice to the Adams Lake Band Chief and Council. He is involved in supervising research to develop a comprehensive Cultural Heritage Program for the band. Dave has also developed marketing and business plans for a partnership that will re-activate the Adam’s Lake Band Sawmill.

Dave is a Registered Professional Forester and alumnus from the Faculty of Forestry, forest resource management program at the University of British Columbia (UBC).

Prior to his current role in rights and title with the Adams Lake Band Dave worked as a Natural Resources Manager for the Adams Lake Indian Band and a resource assistant with the Ministry of Forests Salmon Arm District. He has served on several boards and advisory committees for the National Aboriginal Forestry Association, Aboriginal Forest Industry Council for BC, First Nations Council of Advisors – UBC Faculty of Forestry and the Association of BC Forest Professionals


Angeline Nyce

Lawyer and Forester, A. Nyce Law Corporation
Angeline is a lawyer practicing in the areas of Corporate/Commercial/M&A Law, Natural Resources Law (Energy, Forestry, Mining and Oil and Gas) and Aboriginal Law and First Nations Legal Issues with a focus on sustainable resource development, integrated resource management and land use issues. She is also a Registered Professional Forester, certified to practice forestry in British Columbia. Her clients include corporations, not-for-profits, governments, investors and contractors.

Angeline provides strategic and legal advice on commercial, regulatory and policy issues related to natural resource development and assets management. She regularly advises clients on leases, licences, contracts, socio-economic benefits, sustainable management and project development agreements, business partnerships and human resources.
Photo credit: Mychaylo Prystupa

Angeline Nyce

Gordon Prest

ABCFP Honorary Member
Gordon dedicated a distinguished career spanning 50 years to forestry operations and aboriginal forestry education. Gordon’s career began with the British Columbia Ministry of Forests in 1963 as a timber cruiser, quickly advanced to positions of forest ranger and forest operations superintendent. In 1988, upon leaving the Ministry of Forests, Gordon became involved with aboriginal education as a forestry instructor at the Nicola Valley Institute of Technology. Gordon is a previous senior staff member of the Faculty of Forestry and was the faculty’s founding First Nations Coordinator in 1994. Gordon was responsible for leading pivotal work in the faculty’s first “Forestry First Nations Strategy”.

In 2009, for his tireless work in promoting aboriginal forestry and forestry education Gordon was honored with the National Aboriginal Achievement Award for environment and conservation and in 2010, the Canadian Institute of Forestry Award for unique and outstanding achievement in forestry in Canada. In 2011, Gordon was awarded an honourary membership to the Association of BC Forest Professionals.

Gordon served for many years as co-chair of the Faculty of Forestry’s First Nations Council of Advisors, aboriginal advisor to the Association of BC Forestry Professionals and a planning advisory committee member for the Institute of Coastal Research for Vancouver Island University. He currently is a member of the UBC President’s Advisory Committee on Aboriginal Affairs.

Gordon continues to contribute as the elder for the First Nations Council of Advisors. Gordon Prest is from the Sto:lo First Nation in Chilliwack BC and currently resides in Merritt, BC.

Gordon’s education training includes the BC Forest Service Ranger Training School; Provincial Instructor Diploma from Vancouver Community College; Native Adult Instructor Diploma from Okanagan Community College and National Instructor Diploma from St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Nova Scotia.

Gordon Prest


Brian Robinson

Forester, Association of BC Forest Professionals
Brian joined the Association of BC Forest Professionals (ABCFP) in 2006. Brian leads the planning and organization of the association’s professional development activities, including the continuing competency program, policy review seminars and various workshops. Brian is also responsible for the association’s member relations. In addition to his forestry knowledge, Brian has an extensive background in professional development and is well known for his ability to work with members on the practical application of their professional obligations.

Brian has been practising forestry for over 35 years. Before joining the ABCFP, he worked as a consultant with Industrial Forestry Service Ltd. and T.M.Thompson and Associates. Brian also worked with Canfor in Woss Lake and Fort St. John. Early in his career, Brian worked on a team that carried out the biogeoclimatic classification of the northwest part of the province based in Smithers. From 1998 to 2002, he served as a council member and past president of the Association of BC Forest Professionals. Brian has lived in Kamloops for the past 21 years. Brian has been a member of the First Nations Council of Advisors since 2006.

Brian Robinson


Sally Sellars

Natural Resources Referral Worker, Tsilhqot’in National Government
Sally graduated from the UBC Faculty of Forestry – Natural Resources Management in 2006 and received her Registered Professional Forester in 2010. Prior to that Sally graduated from Nicola Valley Institute of Technology in 1997 with an Environmental Resource Technology Diploma. Sally is passionate about continuously building forest resource opportunities. Sally currently works as the Natural Resources Referral Worker for the Tsilhqot’in National Government to assist the community with resource development challenges. Prior to that, she worked as a Natural Resources Manager for the Soda Creek Indian Band where she is a member and as a First Nation Relations Officer for the Ministry of Forests, Lands, and Natural Resources. Sally is also on the Board of Directors for Thompson Rivers University –Applied Sustainable Ranching in Williams Lake since 2014.

Sellars has been a member of the UBC First Nations Council of Advisors since 2006.

Ellen Simmons


Ellen Simmons

Professor and Board Director, Okanagan Similkameen Conservation Alliance
Ellen Simmons, originally from Saskatchewan (Swampy Cree), is a biology/ecology professor in Penticton, BC who works to promote Indigenous knowledge in relation to sustainable forest management and educate others about cultural traditions amongst Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities. She is also working with the Penticton Indian Band Adult Education Centre as a science and math teacher. She brings forth over fifteen years of experience within the environmental/conservation sector offering a unique skill set that communicates the necessity of including Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) alongside western scientific approaches in Natural Resource practises. She holds an MSc. in Environmental Sciences (Royal Roads University) and a BSc. in Forestry (UBC Vancouver). Additionally, she represents the En’owkin Center (a post secondary Indigenous institution) as a Board Director for the Okanagan Similkameen Conservation Alliance.
Alongside, she also works to protect the endangered and rare black cottonwood lowland forests.

Ellen Simmons


Matt Wealick

Forester and COO, Ts’elxwéyeqw Tribe Management Limited
I am a First Nations Registered Professional Forester (RPF). I grew up in Sayward BC, a small coastal logging community on north Vancouver Island. I have a Bachelor of Science in Forestry from the University of British Columbia, specializing in forest resource management. In 2006, I acquired a Master of Science in Environment and Management from Royal Roads University. I am a Sto:lo person and a member of the Tzeachten First Nation that originate from the Chilliwack Valley since time immemorial. In 2005, after gaining 17 years of experience working in the Interior and on the Coast in a multitude of roles, I have returned to my father’s home town of Chilliwack, BC to manage the Ts’elxwéyeqw Tribe’s forestry business Ts’elxwéyeqw Forestry Limited Partnership.

I was provided the opportunity to build a forest company from the ground up. With day-to-day business I work in every aspect of forestry, from government negotiations, planning, harvesting operations, silviculture, public relations, and finance. As well I work in other areas of forestry that are not within a normal RPF’s scope of practice, such as Aboriginal rights and title, traditional and cultural use, and capacity building.

In 2012, the Ts’elxwéyeqw Tribe’s reorganized its corporate structure, to create one management company to manage multiple companies and business types. The types of business that the Tribe is involved with are title and rights, economic development, forest management, run-of-the-river, recreation, property management, and community engagement. In 2012 I was asked to be the Chief Operations Officer for Ts’elxwéyeqw Tribe Management Limited, the company that manages all the Ts’elxwéyeqw Tribe’s businesses. The company structures have grown from one to 14 in less than a decade.
First Nations values and their relation to the natural resources have become a topic at the forefront of discussion across the province. This has provided Ts’elxwéyeqw Tribe, through myself, to have voice at provincial committees that help guide provincial natural resource policy. This has provided myself the oppurtunity to work with and learn from many talented people from across the province. I hope that my operational experience and connections to the First Nations communities have helped those that I have worked with acquire a better understanding of First Nation’s issues thus allowing them to create stronger and more efficient working relationship with First Nation communities in their area.
Photo credit: Mychaylo Prystupa

Matt Weallick